Category Archives: Media Relations

Live, Baby, Live! Storytelling on Facebook Livestream

Facebook Livestream tips for on location

Facebook Livestream tips for on location

Facebook Livestream has brought communicators a fabulous storytelling tool for clients. Whether you are looking to cover an event, launch a new product, host a seminar or share news, it is a simple way to engage specific target audiences.

In fact, I recently worked with a local television station partner to amplify messaging for a public education campaign via Facebook Livestream on location and wanted to share a few tips:

• Once you determine a date/time, share that information across your social platforms to help gain an audience; repost it during and after with links to the livestream, as appropriate.
• Scout out a location beforehand and determine connections, best lighting, areas with the least noise/interruptions, etc.
• If you are outside, check on the placement of the sun and shading. Read more after the jump…

Two Takeaways from Study on Consumer Buying Habits and Influencer Marketing

Consumer Buying Habits from Influencer Recommendations

Influencer marketing, especially working with bloggers, is one of the aspects I love most about the communications landscape today. At GFM we talk a lot about bloggers – from ones with huge national reach to the best bloggers closer to home here in Colorado – because we’ve seen firsthand, measurable impact from influencer campaigns. I find the good ones to be professional, creative, patient and extremely hardworking. I personally define “the good ones” less on their reach, though that is extremely important, but more so by how well they know their brand, audience and most importantly, stay true to those things rather than becoming a product review monger.

Impact of Influencer Marketing on Consumers

A few weeks ago a colleague shared a great article with me, “Influencer content accounts for almost 20% of consumer media consumption,” and I’ve come back to it numerous times. The statistics that caught my attention include:

  • More than 50% of the 1,000-people surveyed over the age of 16 made a purchase based on an influencer recommendation. This jumps to 69% when you narrow in on millennials
  • The average consumer now spends one hour and 12 minutes enjoying online
    influencer content
  • Consumers between 35 and 45 attached more importance to food influencers; 45 and older look at influencers most for health and travel recommendations

Keys to Effective Influencer Marketing

I take two primary learnings away from these findings:

  1. If your content creation strategy does not include working with influencers in your space, you’re likely missing huge opportunities.
  2. Smart marketers will make every last penny of an influencer marketing budget go the extra mile by repurposing content across multiple platforms and working with influencers to tag/target/talk to their built-in audience. No longer should a blogger outreach program live in a PR silo. Instead, gather all of the best communications’ minds around the table, including social media, digital advertising and SEO, to amplify influencer content well beyond one blog post or Instagram photo.

I share these two opinions with a big caveat. Influencer marketing only works when you work with the right people. Not every blogger is worth their sponsor/partner fee, not by a long shot. Further, once you have established and respected relationships with influencers, you shouldn’t feel nickel-and-dimed every time you share ideas or quick pieces of content with them—like a tweet about a charitable cause. The best relationships should turn into a give-and-take where you ultimately treat one another like resources—never taking advantage, while always being willing to support each other’s best interests.

The “rules” for influencer marketing are blurry at best. However, if you let the unknowns and initial setbacks (because you will have some) deter you from getting started, you’ll find it harder and harder to catch up in the long run.

Journalism and a Trump White House: What are the PR Takeaways?

Saturday Night Live Sean Spicer Press Conference SkitNo matter what side of the aisle your political beliefs fall, it’s hard not to watch the very public antagonistic relationship President Trump and his administration are having with the media.

While President Obama had his fair share of scuffles with the media, they didn’t get the kind of attention President Trump’s school-yard battles are getting now. After several decades during which the media has lost trust, credibility and interest among Americans, will the new President bring back the Fourth Estate to its former glory?

I recently came across a Politico article titled: Trump Is Making Journalism Great Again. According to the article, there’s always been a quid pro quo in Washington, where journalists groom sources, but sources also groom journalists. “There’s nothing inherently unethical about the back-scratching. When a reporter calls an administration source to confirm an embarrassing item, the source may agree to confirm as long as the reporter at the very least agrees to listen sympathetically to the administration’s context.”

Read more after the jump…

Media Relations Takeaways from Maternity Leave

Last week I returned to GFM after the second maternity leave of my tenure and have been eager to share observations and tips related to media relations that have been swirling in my PR-minded brain since we got home from the hospital.

We welcomed Anderson boy #2 on Oct. 23, 2016 and I was fortunate to be able to spend 13 wonderful weeks at home with our newest addition.

But, like many a PR pro will admit, “unplugging” is simply not in my nature.

Read more after the jump…

Fake News vs. Real News – How Can You Tell the Difference?

screen-shot-2016-12-13-at-8-53-19-amThere was a lot of news coverage of “fake news” leading up to and following the recent presidential election, but after doing some digging, it became clear that fake news and fake news sites are nothing new.

And it’s not just fake news that’s getting attention. I came across a story about how a police department in Central California issued a fake news release to the media to protect a person who was sure to be killed by rival gang members. Many in the local media were highly critical of the police’s actions, but the Santa Maria police made no apologies.

In an ever-shrinking media landscape with fewer and fewer “real” media and reporters, how do you tell real from fake news? The New York Times covered this topic in an appropriately titled headline: Inside a Fake News Sausage Factory: ‘This Is All About Income’. The article covered how a computer science major from Georgia (the country), started creating fake stories about Hillary Clinton on a website he set up, and watched his Google ad sales soar as more and more people found the site. He really started making money when he began creating content about Donald Trump.

Read more after the jump…

First Things First

blogpic_firstthingsfirstThanksgiving has come and gone (hard to believe!), but I still feel compelled to dedicate this blog post to it as it happens to be my favorite holiday. Unfortunately, however, it tends to get short-shrifted every year as people tend to jump right from Halloween to Christmas. No sooner does Halloween end, then stores start putting out their holiday decorations (if they haven’t already done so), we are inundated with holiday catalogs, and radio stations start playing holiday music. To which I say – FIRST THINGS FIRST! Thanksgiving comes before the December holidays, and we should absolutely honor that. Goodness knows we should never overlook an opportunity to slow down and be thankful.
Read more after the jump…

“Four Email Subject Lines That Make Everyone Hate You”…Including Media

emailGiven reporters rarely respond to the first email, just about every PR-professional has had follow-up via email or a phone call.

I recently came across this Fast Company article that I think can also apply to emails you send reporters: “Four Email Subject Lines That Make Everyone Hate You.” Here are some of the lines that the article calls out as ones to avoid:

Read more after the jump…

Skills That Are Needed for Today’s Communications Jobs

My colleague, Karla, and I recently had the opportunity to speak to a class of college students as part of a PR 101 class. The students, most of whom were studying communications with an emphasis in PR, were interested in how to get hired once they graduated from school. As we described what a “typical” day looks like for us, we also shared some of the critical skills that are needed to work in marketing communications today.

What Matters:

Read more after the jump…

Study Finds Americans Differ on the Value Media Provides

mediaNot surprisingly, Americans disagree about how the media cover the news, and what they believe are the media’s best and worst traits. According to a Pew Research Center study that was conducted in early 2016, Americans were asked to share what they thought were the most positive and negative things the news media do.

The most positive thing the media do, according to 30 percent of respondents, is to report the news. Next, 25 percent say the media provide a public service, like providing information or serving as a watch dog. Last, people say the media share uplifting stories (8 percent).

Read more after the jump…

Don’t Forget the Good News

superheroes“If it bleeds, it leads.” It’s the adage that the news has lived by for as long as I can remember. But I – and I know I’m not alone here – get so tired of hearing so much bad news. Yes, there are issues and crises going on in the world that we need to be aware of. Absolutely. But there are positive things happening out there that we need to know about as well.

Read more after the jump…