Category Archives: Messaging

Five Ways to Resonate With Generation Z

As a digital marketer, my daily mission is to understand where people are spending their time and how to connect with them. Generational differences fascinate me, as this is one of the first things I consider when I craft a marketing message.  Now that we’ve spent the last 10 years talking about Millennials, let’s take a deep-dive into the next generation on the rise – Generation Z.

Generation Z: Who They Are

Born between the mid-1990’s and mid-2000’s, members of Generation Z have grown up in the Millennials’ shadow. Comprising 26% of the U.S. population, they’re now the largest generation.

Generation Z: How to Speak Their Language

Based on their unique characteristics, here are five things to keep in mind when marketing to Generation Z.

  • Generation Z taking a selfie | Photo Credit Elijah O'DonellThink Tech Savvy: This generation is fondly termed “digital natives,” because they don’t remember a world without the internet or cell phones – let that sink in. Why would they spend any time on your website if they can’t easily navigate it on their cell phone? Why would they trust your brand if you don’t have a digital presence? When marketing to them, it’s important to have a digital-first and mobile-first strategy.
  • You Don’t Have Their Full Attention: Gen Z are the ultimate multi-taskers who consistently use multiple devices at one time. With an attention span of 8 seconds, it’s important to make your content easily consumable. Stats and other impactful information should not be hidden in a wall of words.
  • Be Authentic: This generation evaluates your brand based on your digital and offline actions. For example, claiming that you care about your customers in a press conference, but ignoring complaints on social media will send up major red flags. It’s vital that your brand lives up to its promises at all times and on all mediums.  
  • Celebrities Are Their BFFs: Thanks to social media platforms like Instagram and Snapchat, Gen Z has an intimate view into the everyday life of their favorite celebrity. Unlike their parent’s generation, they don’t have to wait for the paparazzi to capture a photo, their favorite celebrities are sharing updates (and influencing purchasing decisions) in real time, multiple times a day. Incorporating pop culture or industry influencers into your marketing strategy can make your brand or product more relatable and relevant to Gen Z.
  • Tap Into Their Entrepreneurial Spirit: According to a 2014 study, 72% of Gen Z high schoolers and 64% of college students said they want to start a business someday. Incorporating inspirational messages and business tactics into your marketing is a great way to provide relevant content to this generation. Remember: Ideas are their currency.

What unique characteristics have you discovered from Generation Z? Want to learn more about targeting your messaging to the right audience? Contact us! We love to chat about audiences, tactics, and all things Colorado.

Olivia Ward is a Director of Digital Strategy at CenterTable. She has more than 10 years of experience helping brands find and target their audience IRL and digitally.

The Importance of Active Voice for Brands

When you reflect on the highway billboards of yesteryear and brand slogans that have made an impression on you, they were probably succinct, clever and written in the active voice. Clear, concise writing is absolutely crucial in a brand’s marketing efforts. When a message or campaign gets muddled with lengthy explanations and awkward sentence constructions, the small window of opportunity to quickly convey both meaning and value is lost. One of the simplest issues to address during content revisions is passive voice construction.

Woman Typing on a Laptop Using an Acive Voice For Brand Messaging

Read more after the jump…

PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade

USC Issues Management Win | PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade | GroundFloor Media PR AgencyNegative media and social media coverage abounds, but in increasingly rare instances clients can turn potentially bad news into a positive or at least a learning opportunity.

Sometimes all it takes is a bit of creativity and humor to mitigate an issues management headache. Case in point, recently the University of Southern California unveiled a $700 million project in the heart of Los Angeles. Students from rival University of California at Los Angeles were quick to point out that a statue serving as the centerpiece of the development misspelled the name of “William Shakespeare” by leaving out the last “e” in the bard’s name.

The Tweet that followed: “USC. The only place in America that can unveil a statue as the centerpiece of a $700 million project and manage to misspell Shakespeare.”

Not taking the bait and issuing a stodgy response, USC issued the following statement:

“To E, or not to E, that is the question. Over the centuries his surname has been spelled 20 different ways. USC chose an older spelling because of the ancient feel of the statue, even though it is not the most common form.”

And with that response, the Twittersphere has been weighing in on the debates, with scholars pointing out USC might have a point. Even in his last will and testament, Shakespeare spelled his name two ways (both with an “e” and without an “e”). Also, printed programs from 1664, spelled the name without an “e.”

The Washington Post even had fun with the issue, saying visitors to the University of Southern California might be muttering, “What fools these mortals be,” as they stroll past a statue of the legendary queen of Troy and notice William Shakespeare’s name seemingly misspelled at the base. “To USC officials, it’s much ado about nothing.”

(GroundFloor Media’s Gil Rudawsky is a proud graduate of the University of Southern California.)

 

Local Media More Trusted than National Media

When it comes to media, who do you trust? If you are like most people, you trust local media more than national media. Local media are perceived to be less biased than national media, and to have less of an agenda.

And the proof is in the ratings. A recent Poynter Institute analysis finds that Americans overwhelmingly view local TV news rather than their cable TV counterparts. Media writer James Warren used Chicago as a benchmark and found:

“The power and potency of local news endures, perhaps all the more so in a fragmented digital age. It’s a reality generally missed by media reporters.”

Local Media More Trusted than National Media - Nielsen Media Research | GroundFloor Media PR Agency

The general public’s reaction to media is analogous to how they perceive politicians. We all hate “Congress,” but we choose to continue to re-elect our own congressional representatives because we believe that our local representatives are somehow different. And that is the power of local.

Want to Bring Your Brand to Life? Start with Messaging.

messagingThe GroundFloor Media team has worked with many organizations that have struggled to tell their story in a way that engages and resonates with target audiences. Building a strong brand starts with messaging. And delivering the right message at the right time is critical to an organization’s success.

I recently read an article, “Why and how you should integrate messaging into branding” by Carolyn McMaster, that talked about how messaging is now considered “verbal branding.” In the article, McMaster said, “if employees don’t understand an organization’s vision, they can’t convey it to their customers, so the organization will miss advocacy opportunities on its two most important fronts.”

Read more after the jump…