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When it Comes to Social Media, Age is Just a Number

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It’s official: more than half (55 percent) of Americans over age 50 are now getting their news from social networks. What’s more, 74 percent of non-whites claim social networks as their source for news, too. Facebook earned the top spot among platforms – in part due to its sizable user base – with YouTube taking silver and Twitter earning bronze. Chances are you’re using these platforms to grow your business and interested in reaching at least some of these audiences, so take a minute to dig into the latest Pew Research for more! In the meantime, here are a few updates to get you off on the right foot.

The Verge: Facebook Launches Crisis Response Hub to Help Users During Disasters and Attacks
Meet Facebook’s newest site feature, Crisis Response. This new hub houses all of the platform’s safety-related tools including Safety Check and Community Help – so whether you’re involved in the crisis, tracking the news or hoping to help those impacted, Facebook has now centralized communication options during a crisis situation. Read more after the jump…

360 Video: To Gimmick Or Not to Gimmick

360 Video: To Gimmick Or Not to Gimmick | CenterTable & GroundFloor MediaTechnology is a fickle beast that can really creep up on you. One minute you’re blissfully content that two-day deliveries exist, and next thing you know, there’s shoes that order pizza and hoverboards that don’t actually hover and function as boneless scooters (turns out keeping wheels on things is still one of the best ways to keep your face from eating concrete).

The advent of 360 cameras was one of those things that crept up on me. From 16 GoPro camera rigs to smartphone clip ons, companies are constantly innovating the way consumers are telling their stories. However, like the proverbial cynical caveman that I occasionally am, the discovery of fire has left me wondering about the best ways to use it.
Read more after the jump…

Disasters in the Digital Age

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It’s hard to believe that when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005 we were living in a T9-texting world without smartphones, Twitter and Instagram, and only college students could use Facebook. Since then, we’ve learned to harness technology and social media to respond to breaking news, including natural disasters. We can declare ourselves safe on Facebook, act as amateur photo journalists on Instagram and donate to charity efforts via Twitter. Hurricanes Harvey and Irma reveal that while Americans continue to demonstrate resolve and resourcefulness, the tools we use to react to natural disasters have changed.

Social Media Today: How to Use Social Media to Stay in Touch Before, During, and After a Disaster
We’re usually explaining why social media is essential to bolster marketing campaigns, but in times of crisis it’s a necessary form of communication. Be sure you are prepared by ensuring you follow key accounts on social and have a game plan, just in case. Read more after the jump…

The Power of Giving Back

GetGrounded_logo_vfThe Get Grounded Foundation recently announced its latest round of grants to four local community programs supporting youth services. A total of more than $17,000 was granted to Child Advocates – CASA of Jefferson & Gilpin Counties, The Bridge Project, The Denver Children’s Advocacy Center and PCs for People. The programs were selected by a volunteer committee made up of individuals from GroundFloor Media and our sister agency CenterTable.

The foundation seeds funding for new or expanded, innovative or entrepreneurial programs or projects within an existing, qualified nonprofit that directly supports the healthy development of at-risk youth between the ages of three and 13 in the Denver Metro area.

In addition to the Get Grounded Foundation, GroundFloor Media encourages employees to actively participate in community service to make a difference through their own charities.

Throughout my career, I’ve found that companies who encourage community involvement separate themselves from their competitors, develop more loyal customers and enhance employee happiness. Participating in community service not only makes a difference to the organizations and people being served, but also makes a difference in your own personal life. Participating in community service activities helps to enhance social awareness and responsibility, while building community relationships.

As a new member of the GroundFloor Media team and as a Colorado native, it is incredibly impactful to know I am working for a company that is committed to making a difference in the Denver community.

The Art of Taking a Step Back

Photo credit: @WiredForLego

Photo credit: @WiredForLego

This week one of our account teams held an “Intense Period Debrief” – an opportunity to assess what went well, what could have gone better and what we can do moving forward to learn from experiences once a project is complete. The irony of this particular meeting was that, in taking the time to take a step back, much of what we learned from this particular account was the importance of taking calculated steps back more often.

The marketing world moves fast – new platforms, new products, content trends (this week it’s sarcastic polls on Twitter, FYI), changes in user behavior… the list of things that change actually changes itself quite frequently.

Add aggressive deadlines and high expectations to the list, and we’re frequently working in a world that pushes forward so fast that it’s easy to forget to step back and think strategically once a plan is in place. Ultimately, the best-laid plans don’t mean much if expectations aren’t set, processes aren’t communicated, and those plans don’t evolve based on trends and ongoing data.

Read more after the jump…

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization?

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization? | GroundFloor Media PR Agency | DenverNonprofits, how are you engaging your corporate partners in experiencing the non-cash value of your organization? When was the last time you invited your corporate partner on a site tour or a behind-the-scenes experience with your services, or asked them to participate in a volunteer opportunity?

A few years ago, I was invited to Children’s Hospital Colorado for a half-day session at the hospital. I was with a small group of other agency partners, community influencers and donors, and we spent the day meeting with doctors, sitting in clinics and touring different departments throughout the hospital. My eyes were opened to the expertise, resource needs and opportunities as well as the challenges in health care.

I also participated this spring in a Denver Public Schools Day of Service with Noble Energy and the Denver Broncos where we helped move classroom furniture at Cheltenham Elementary School, participated in field day activities and met with the principal and teachers. As a parent, education is a top priority for me, and being able to step into the hallways for the day and feel the impact of budget cuts was eye-opening. Read more after the jump…

PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade

USC Issues Management Win | PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade | GroundFloor Media PR AgencyNegative media and social media coverage abounds, but in increasingly rare instances clients can turn potentially bad news into a positive or at least a learning opportunity.

Sometimes all it takes is a bit of creativity and humor to mitigate an issues management headache. Case in point, recently the University of Southern California unveiled a $700 million project in the heart of Los Angeles. Students from rival University of California at Los Angeles were quick to point out that a statue serving as the centerpiece of the development misspelled the name of “William Shakespeare” by leaving out the last “e” in the bard’s name.

The Tweet that followed: “USC. The only place in America that can unveil a statue as the centerpiece of a $700 million project and manage to misspell Shakespeare.”

Not taking the bait and issuing a stodgy response, USC issued the following statement:

“To E, or not to E, that is the question. Over the centuries his surname has been spelled 20 different ways. USC chose an older spelling because of the ancient feel of the statue, even though it is not the most common form.”

And with that response, the Twittersphere has been weighing in on the debates, with scholars pointing out USC might have a point. Even in his last will and testament, Shakespeare spelled his name two ways (both with an “e” and without an “e”). Also, printed programs from 1664, spelled the name without an “e.”

The Washington Post even had fun with the issue, saying visitors to the University of Southern California might be muttering, “What fools these mortals be,” as they stroll past a statue of the legendary queen of Troy and notice William Shakespeare’s name seemingly misspelled at the base. “To USC officials, it’s much ado about nothing.”

(GroundFloor Media’s Gil Rudawsky is a proud graduate of the University of Southern California.)

 

Using brand laddering to improve social media engagement

Why does someone love your product or brand? It’s probably not because it comes in pink. One way to find the answer to that question is through a process called brand laddering. If you’re not familiar with brand Laddering it’s a way of identifying the personal and societal values people hold that a product or brand connects to. Big brands spend a lot of time and money on qualitative interviews to get this information. For smaller brands or nonprofits, going through the full process might not be possible, but it’s still worth doing some small scale brand laddering, even as a thought exercise. Even big brands can’t conduct complete brand laddering exercises for every social post they do, but any brand big or small can apply the concepts of brand laddering to something as common as social media posts. Read more after the jump…

The Eclipse, Video and Snapchat News

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Is video eclipsing all other forms of content? All puns aside, social platforms’ focus continues to land squarely on video content, as showcased from a couple of our articles this week. Additionally, news outlets are continuing to pour resources and efforts into shorter, bite-sized newscasts on Snapchat with both NBC and CNN making big moves on that platform.

Video:

eMarketer: How Social Platforms Are Using Video to Capture Audience Attention
We’ve been hearing more and more about the prominence of digital video (and in case you missed it, CenterTable had some pretty big news in that world earlier this month!), and this article outlines how social platforms are continuing to look for ways to get a larger piece of the overall “digital video pie.”  Read more after the jump…

What Words and Phrases Can We Eliminate From Our Writing?

Screen Shot 2017-08-23 at 10.57.36 AMHow can Twitter’s 140 character missives, and pithy Snapchat highlights get translated into our everyday writing as communicators?

Every time I reach for my AP Style Book, I am reminded of a college journalism professor who left her mark on me for a couple of reasons: First, we had weekly quizzes on the AP Style Book, which was a great way to learn and practice the rules. And if you weren’t sure there was a rule, at least we all learned to use the book to see if a rule existed.

Second, she was a stickler for writing in the simplest terms, using concise, action words and cutting out fat from our writing. Following is a list of words or phrases that should be eliminated from our writing, along with a suitable replacement word. Just like Bitly and Tiny URL help us shorten URLs for social media, this list can help tighten all of our writing. What are some of your favorite words or phrases that can be omitted and replaced with a single word?

Instead of: Use:
In order to To
Utilize Use
Very ugly, very fat, very angry Hideous, obese, furious
In the event that If
On account of the fact that

Because of the fact that

Due to the fact that

Because
In spite of the fact that Although, though, despite
In the absence of Without
In the event that If
A large proportion of Many
In a situation in which When
There is a need for Must
Subsequent to After
Impact on Affect
Along the lines of Like
At the present time Now, currently