Tag Archives: community relations

Meeting With a Corporate Partner For a Sponsorship? Be Prepared.

6 Tips To Prepare For a Sponsorship Meeting With a Corporate Partner | GroundFloor Media PR Agency in DenverIf you are meeting with a corporate partner to discuss a sponsorship proposal or charitable donation request, be prepared. Just as you would prepare for a new business meeting or job interview, you have one shot to make the best possible impression, so do your homework and come to the meeting prepared. The key to success? It should be all about them.

Whether you have worked with a corporate partner for multiple years or you are meeting for the first time, here’s what to research, prepare and bring to the meeting:

Read more after the jump…

How Nonprofits Can Demonstrate ROI to Partners

Student Advocacy Annual Report Example of How Nonprofits Can Demonstrate ROI to Partners Demonstrating ROI for a grant or a sponsorship is critical for nonprofits to maintain and build long-term partnerships with businesses. There are some foundations that require their own lengthy reporting, but if they don’t, read on.

Whether we’re talking about a $1,000 or $100,000 sponsorship program, nonprofits should track everything and provide a follow-up report specifically tailored to the grant/sponsorship’s support. This report doesn’t have to be a massive document; it actually should be a simple 1-5 page report, or better yet, a PowerPoint. These can be thought of as mini annual reports.

Here’s what to include: Read more after the jump…

Stop Chasing Short-term Corporate Sponsorship Dollars

Corporate Dollars & Sponsorships Graphic | GroundFloor MediaLet’s be honest, chasing corporate sponsorships or charitable donations is a challenging job for both the nonprofit partner and the corporate partner. Wouldn’t it be nice to secure long-term partnerships that allow for building relationships, additional time for strategic planning, the ability to execute events and/or programs AND generate measurable results? YES!

I love this quote by Stephen Kinzer, “Alliances and partnerships produce stability when they reflect realities and interests.” Getting the stars to align is no small task. However, here are a few tips for moving things in the right direction for corporate giving teams and nonprofit partners:

Read more after the jump…

Building Corporate Partners: It’s Not About the Gala

partnership-penIt is gala season! That means nonprofits are seeking corporate sponsorship dollars to not only help support these large events, but to help fund much needed programs throughout the year. At the same time, businesses are trying to justify community investment dollars as their budgets shrink.

If you work for a nonprofit and are preparing to meet with a corporate partner, it’s time to reevaluate your ask and look toward long-term programs with measurable return on investment (ROI). And I’m not talking about touting the number of people served or programs activated via your organization. Although these are incredibly important, they focus on your organization and not the corporate partner. You have to build a case for why the corporate partner should invest in your organization. Read more after the jump…

Small Idea, Big Movement

bohsw-zcuaavuieI love great ideas! Especially the ones that start out small but then revolutionize an industry. In 2007, a like-minded group of individuals, including Pam Warhurst and Mary Clear, wanted to find a way in which everyone could help improve their own community. Their solution: They taught their local residents to take control of their community through gardening and eating.

“The answer was food,” said Warhurst in her TED Talk. “Everyone understands food. Food gets people talking; even better, it inspires people to take action.” They started with small herb gardens and community plots in a Northern England town called Todmorden. Then they planted corn in front of a police station, fruit trees on the sides of roads, vegetables in front of the senior center, and even planted gardens in the cemetery, where “things grow really well because the soil is really good!” Read more after the jump…

The “Buy One, Give One” Approach to Cause Marketing

Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 11.38.06 AMI recently read an Advertising Age article about Target’s new cause marketing campaign (launched July 13) in which, for every Up & Up brand school supply purchased between July 13 and Aug. 2, the retailer will donate one Up & Up brand school supply product to a child in need via the Kids In Need Foundation. While this tactic may not necessarily be new – in fact, here is a list of ten “Buy One, Give One” Companies – I’m intrigued by Target’s use of this approach to build awareness and share for a specific category within a specific brand. (This is an approach we are seeing more frequently as the “Buy One, Give One” model continues to grow in popularity. As indicated in this Winter 2014 article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, companies such as Kiehl’s, Sephora, Whole Foods and Aveda have also introduced buy one, give one items.)

Read more after the jump…

Good Corporate Citizenship = Good Business

At GroundFloor Media, we strongly believe in companies giving back to their communities – this will come as no surprise to those of you who know us. We believe in it primarily because we know it is the right thing to do – but we also believe in the concept of “doing well by doing good.”

The Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College recently released its 2012 State of Corporate Citizenship report, and its findings certainly support this notion. The report reveals the results of the Center’s fifth biennial survey of business executives on the topic of corporate citizenship. And in it, “executives issue a clear verdict — corporate citizenship delivers real business results. It doesn’t just make firms look good and employees feel good. It helps to achieve business goals such as increasing market share and managing risk.”

Read more after the jump…

GroundFloor Media In The Community

Food Bank of the Rockies

The GFM team at Food Bank of the Rockies

Those of you who read our blog regularly know that giving back to the community is central to what GFM is all about. While our community outreach takes many forms, including providing pro bono PR support to our nonprofit partner SafeHouse Denver, offering a discounted rate to other nonprofit clients, and our Get Grounded volunteer program, last week it took the form of a team volunteer day at Food Bank of the Rockies.

Twice a year – generally in the spring and fall – we take time as a team to step away from our computers and complete a community service project. Earlier this year, we spent an afternoon with the kiddos in Colfax Community Network’s after school program. Last Tuesday, we spent the morning at Food Bank of the Rockies, filling boxes with food for the USDA Commodity Supplemental Food Program, a program that targets low-income pregnant and postpartum women, their infants and children, and seniors. At the end of our two-hour shift, we had built and packed more than 300 boxes of food. We also collectively donated more than $300 to another Food Bank program, Totes of Hope, through which kids in need receive totes filled with 8 – 9 pounds of nutritious kid-friendly food on Fridays to help carry them through the weekend. It felt great knowing that we’d been able to contribute to such worthy causes, and it was a lot of fun spending time together away from the office. And, as Kimmie Greene wrote last week, being able to work together in the community is a great source of inspiration for our team!

Read more after the jump…