Tag Archives: corporate partners

Nonprofit Sector: Are You Creating Shared Value for Your Corporate Partners?

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Nonprofits creating shared value for their corporate partners are seeing impacts to their fundraising efforts and the role of their organization in a community. The term, Creating Shared Value (CSV), is where nonprofits collaborate with companies to build meaningful and impactful partnerships to advance positive social change.

Jocelyne Daw, a recognized pioneer and leading expert in the evolution of authentic business and community partnerships, explains CSV as follows, “Creating Shared Value is a new form of corporate community involvement. Shared value is created when companies generate economic value for themselves in a way that simultaneously produces value for society by addressing social and environmental challenges.”

Daw explains that companies undertaking shared value initiatives need community partners to help them reconceive markets and services; build clusters; or reduce the costs in their value chain. “Shared value initiatives require the expertise, experience and knowledge of the community sector. At its heart, shared value requires cross-sector collaboration and deep partnerships,” Daw says.

Gone are the days where corporate partners are seen only as funders. Nonprofits need to seek common goals and build programs of mutual benefit. CSV initiatives provide support beyond philanthropy and are an added benefit to what companies are already contributing in their communities. “Shared value allows companies to generate value for themselves as they identify the immense human needs that must be met, large new markets to be served, and the internal costs of social deficits—as well as the competitive advantages available from addressing them,” Daw says.

What does this look like? In an article from the Harvard Business Review, businesses like Nestlé, Johnson & Johnson, and Unilever have incorporated this concept into their partnership programs. “Nestlé, for example, redesigned its coffee procurement processes, working intensively with small farmers in impoverished areas who were trapped in a cycle of low productivity, poor quality and environmental degradation. Nestlé provided advice on farming practices; helped growers secure plant stock, fertilizers, and pesticides; and began directly paying them a premium for better beans. Higher yields and quality increased the growers’ incomes, the environmental impact of farms shrank, and Nestlé’s reliable supply of good coffee grew significantly. Shared value was created,” says Michael E. Porter, of Harvard Business School, and Mark R. Kramer, the managing director of the social impact advisory firm FSG.

We’ll be hearing and seeing more about CSV partnerships in the coming years. They provide a competitive advantage and anything that impacts the bottom line can’t be ignored. It will be exciting to see which organizations embrace these changes moving forward and how they continue to affect communities.

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization?

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization? | GroundFloor Media PR Agency | DenverNonprofits, how are you engaging your corporate partners in experiencing the non-cash value of your organization? When was the last time you invited your corporate partner on a site tour or a behind-the-scenes experience with your services, or asked them to participate in a volunteer opportunity?

A few years ago, I was invited to Children’s Hospital Colorado for a half-day session at the hospital. I was with a small group of other agency partners, community influencers and donors, and we spent the day meeting with doctors, sitting in clinics and touring different departments throughout the hospital. My eyes were opened to the expertise, resource needs and opportunities as well as the challenges in health care.

I also participated this spring in a Denver Public Schools Day of Service with Noble Energy and the Denver Broncos where we helped move classroom furniture at Cheltenham Elementary School, participated in field day activities and met with the principal and teachers. As a parent, education is a top priority for me, and being able to step into the hallways for the day and feel the impact of budget cuts was eye-opening. Read more after the jump…

Meeting With a Corporate Partner For a Sponsorship? Be Prepared.

6 Tips To Prepare For a Sponsorship Meeting With a Corporate Partner | GroundFloor Media PR Agency in DenverIf you are meeting with a corporate partner to discuss a sponsorship proposal or charitable donation request, be prepared. Just as you would prepare for a new business meeting or job interview, you have one shot to make the best possible impression, so do your homework and come to the meeting prepared. The key to success? It should be all about them.

Whether you have worked with a corporate partner for multiple years or you are meeting for the first time, here’s what to research, prepare and bring to the meeting:

Read more after the jump…

Stop Chasing Short-term Corporate Sponsorship Dollars

Corporate Dollars & Sponsorships Graphic | GroundFloor MediaLet’s be honest, chasing corporate sponsorships or charitable donations is a challenging job for both the nonprofit partner and the corporate partner. Wouldn’t it be nice to secure long-term partnerships that allow for building relationships, additional time for strategic planning, the ability to execute events and/or programs AND generate measurable results? YES!

I love this quote by Stephen Kinzer, “Alliances and partnerships produce stability when they reflect realities and interests.” Getting the stars to align is no small task. However, here are a few tips for moving things in the right direction for corporate giving teams and nonprofit partners:

Read more after the jump…