Tag Archives: corporate social responsibility

Giving Back: 2017 Community Impact Report

Community Impact Report 2017Giving back is embedded in our culture and is a core value of GroundFloor Media and CenterTable.

Since our inception in 2001, we have been committed to investing in our community. This is reflected through cash contributions, pro bono public relations and digital marketing services, reduced billing rates for nonprofit clients, community service and paid time off for GroundFloor Media and CenterTable team members to volunteer with various community organizations and causes.

We typically aren’t braggadocios, but as a small business, we are very proud of our efforts as a company and the impact our employees make in the community. For the first time ever, we’ve compiled a Community Impact Report. It is a cumulative overview of our grants through our Get Grounded Foundation, financial matches through our Get Grounded Volunteer Program, Get Giving days of service, being named a Certified B Corporation, membership in giving organizations and participation on a variety of boards and committees.

As you can see from our annual report, all of us wholeheartedly believe that giving back in all shapes and forms strengthens our community, brings people together, provides us with valuable experience and insight and offers balance to our personal and professional lives.

Instagram + New York = All The Feels

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This week, let’s cut straight to the chase and share two terrific stories that have us swooning. As you may know, we’re remodeling our office so we’ve got our eyes peeled for hip design trends. So, you can imagine our delight at this article (with pics, of course) about How Instagram Made Its New York Office Highly Instagrammable. Amazing! Swept up in a New York state of mind? Let us give you another reason to love the Big Apple by introducing you to the New York Public Library’s new Instagram stories campaign that puts the story back in stories by turning classic novels into – well – stories. Genius! We simply cannot wait to see this campaign unfold. Meanwhile in other news… 

U.S. News & World Report: Social Media Makes People Change Their Views

New research indicates that 14 percent of Americans have changed their views on a social or political topic within the last year because of something they saw on social media. With elections coming up, this is a pretty incredible statistic. Learn more about the research in this comprehensive recap. Read more after the jump…

Will Millennials Drive Socially Responsible Marketing Practices?

Millennials want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a social responsible way | GroundFloor Media PR Agency

Millennials want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a social responsible way.

Millennials just might be the key to driving socially responsible marketing practices. They want the companies they patronize to practice business sustainably and ethically. Not only that, they want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a socially responsible way. Why should we listen? Because by 2030 millennials will outnumber boomers by 22 million per a Pew Research Center report.

Here’s a few more stats to consider from Nielson’s Global Corporate Sustainability Report published in 2015:

Read more after the jump…

Nonprofit Sector: Are You Creating Shared Value for Your Corporate Partners?

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Nonprofits creating shared value for their corporate partners are seeing impacts to their fundraising efforts and the role of their organization in a community. The term, Creating Shared Value (CSV), is where nonprofits collaborate with companies to build meaningful and impactful partnerships to advance positive social change.

Jocelyne Daw, a recognized pioneer and leading expert in the evolution of authentic business and community partnerships, explains CSV as follows, “Creating Shared Value is a new form of corporate community involvement. Shared value is created when companies generate economic value for themselves in a way that simultaneously produces value for society by addressing social and environmental challenges.”

Daw explains that companies undertaking shared value initiatives need community partners to help them reconceive markets and services; build clusters; or reduce the costs in their value chain. “Shared value initiatives require the expertise, experience and knowledge of the community sector. At its heart, shared value requires cross-sector collaboration and deep partnerships,” Daw says.

Gone are the days where corporate partners are seen only as funders. Nonprofits need to seek common goals and build programs of mutual benefit. CSV initiatives provide support beyond philanthropy and are an added benefit to what companies are already contributing in their communities. “Shared value allows companies to generate value for themselves as they identify the immense human needs that must be met, large new markets to be served, and the internal costs of social deficits—as well as the competitive advantages available from addressing them,” Daw says.

What does this look like? In an article from the Harvard Business Review, businesses like Nestlé, Johnson & Johnson, and Unilever have incorporated this concept into their partnership programs. “Nestlé, for example, redesigned its coffee procurement processes, working intensively with small farmers in impoverished areas who were trapped in a cycle of low productivity, poor quality and environmental degradation. Nestlé provided advice on farming practices; helped growers secure plant stock, fertilizers, and pesticides; and began directly paying them a premium for better beans. Higher yields and quality increased the growers’ incomes, the environmental impact of farms shrank, and Nestlé’s reliable supply of good coffee grew significantly. Shared value was created,” says Michael E. Porter, of Harvard Business School, and Mark R. Kramer, the managing director of the social impact advisory firm FSG.

We’ll be hearing and seeing more about CSV partnerships in the coming years. They provide a competitive advantage and anything that impacts the bottom line can’t be ignored. It will be exciting to see which organizations embrace these changes moving forward and how they continue to affect communities.

The Current State of CSR in America

Corporate Social Responsibility 2017 Report

Photo Credit: Cone Communications

“2017 will be remembered as the year that redefined corporate social responsibility. Although CSR will always be grounded in business operations…the stakes have gotten a lot higher. Companies must now share not only what they are doing, but what they believe in.”

 ~ 2017 Cone Communications CSR Study

Cone Communications recently released the results of its annual CSR study, and as usual, it was packed with great insights for cause marketers. While a full breakdown of the study results can be found on Cone Communications’ website, I want to focus on three points in particular.

Read more after the jump…

New Research on Millennial Habits and Corporate Social Responsibility

Millennials – they seem to be all the marketing world is buzzing about these days.

And for good reason. According to Dan Schawbel’s January 2015 Forbes article, “10 New Findings About The Millennial Consumer,” there are 80 million Millennials with $200 billion in annual purchasing power in the U.S. alone. No wonder companies are clamoring to find ways to engage them.

Read more after the jump…

Cause Marketing “Coopetition” – Joining Forces to Make a Big Impact

I recently came across an article on Forbes.com titled “Cause Marketing Coopetition on the Rise” by cause marketing guru David Hessekiel that I wanted to share here – because, to me, it really speaks to the true spirit of cause marketing (or at least what that spirit should be).

Read more after the jump…