Tag Archives: CSR

Will Millennials Drive Socially Responsible Marketing Practices?

Millennials want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a social responsible way | GroundFloor Media PR Agency

Millennials want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a social responsible way.

Millennials just might be the key to driving socially responsible marketing practices. They want the companies they patronize to practice business sustainably and ethically. Not only that, they want companies to pay attention to how they are marketing and do so in a socially responsible way. Why should we listen? Because by 2030 millennials will outnumber boomers by 22 million per a Pew Research Center report.

Here’s a few more stats to consider from Nielson’s Global Corporate Sustainability Report published in 2015:

Read more after the jump…

Nonprofit Sector: Are You Creating Shared Value for Your Corporate Partners?

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Prof. Michael Porter, Harvard University explains the difference between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Creating Shared Value (CSV)

Nonprofits creating shared value for their corporate partners are seeing impacts to their fundraising efforts and the role of their organization in a community. The term, Creating Shared Value (CSV), is where nonprofits collaborate with companies to build meaningful and impactful partnerships to advance positive social change.

Jocelyne Daw, a recognized pioneer and leading expert in the evolution of authentic business and community partnerships, explains CSV as follows, “Creating Shared Value is a new form of corporate community involvement. Shared value is created when companies generate economic value for themselves in a way that simultaneously produces value for society by addressing social and environmental challenges.”

Daw explains that companies undertaking shared value initiatives need community partners to help them reconceive markets and services; build clusters; or reduce the costs in their value chain. “Shared value initiatives require the expertise, experience and knowledge of the community sector. At its heart, shared value requires cross-sector collaboration and deep partnerships,” Daw says.

Gone are the days where corporate partners are seen only as funders. Nonprofits need to seek common goals and build programs of mutual benefit. CSV initiatives provide support beyond philanthropy and are an added benefit to what companies are already contributing in their communities. “Shared value allows companies to generate value for themselves as they identify the immense human needs that must be met, large new markets to be served, and the internal costs of social deficits—as well as the competitive advantages available from addressing them,” Daw says.

What does this look like? In an article from the Harvard Business Review, businesses like Nestlé, Johnson & Johnson, and Unilever have incorporated this concept into their partnership programs. “Nestlé, for example, redesigned its coffee procurement processes, working intensively with small farmers in impoverished areas who were trapped in a cycle of low productivity, poor quality and environmental degradation. Nestlé provided advice on farming practices; helped growers secure plant stock, fertilizers, and pesticides; and began directly paying them a premium for better beans. Higher yields and quality increased the growers’ incomes, the environmental impact of farms shrank, and Nestlé’s reliable supply of good coffee grew significantly. Shared value was created,” says Michael E. Porter, of Harvard Business School, and Mark R. Kramer, the managing director of the social impact advisory firm FSG.

We’ll be hearing and seeing more about CSV partnerships in the coming years. They provide a competitive advantage and anything that impacts the bottom line can’t be ignored. It will be exciting to see which organizations embrace these changes moving forward and how they continue to affect communities.

Building Communities Together: Nonprofit & Corporate Partnerships

Get Connected: Building Communities Together - A Panel Discussion on Nonprofit and Corporate Partnerships | GroundFloor Media & CenterTable

Creating a community of care. Colorado leaders converge at @GroundFloorPR to learn about partnerships #GFMpartnerships

Building community partnerships between nonprofit organizations and businesses, with the goal of tackling seemingly intractable social problems, is a long-term strategy. Not only is the private sector interested in addressing difficult social issues, but it may also have other business goals around providing meaningful employee engagement opportunities, showing shareholders a strong ROI, and coming together as a united team to make a difference in a community.

GroundFloor Media and CenterTable assembled a group of local community and business leaders for a panel discussion at our Get Connected event earlier this month. The focus was a discussion on how they are forging new alliances and breaking new ground to build a better community.

The Get Connected panelists included:

  • Andrea Fulton, Deputy Director and CMO, Denver Art Museum
  • Diana Ralston, Executive Director of The Can’d Aid Foundation and the Director of Sponsorships for Oskar Blues Brewery
  • Jim Johnston, Senior Marketing Manager, Bellco Credit Union
  • Ned Breslin, CEO, Tennyson Center for Children
  • Patsy Landaveri, Senior Community Affairs Advisor, Noble Energy

Read more after the jump…

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization?

What is the Non-Cash Value of Experiencing Your Organization? | GroundFloor Media PR Agency | DenverNonprofits, how are you engaging your corporate partners in experiencing the non-cash value of your organization? When was the last time you invited your corporate partner on a site tour or a behind-the-scenes experience with your services, or asked them to participate in a volunteer opportunity?

A few years ago, I was invited to Children’s Hospital Colorado for a half-day session at the hospital. I was with a small group of other agency partners, community influencers and donors, and we spent the day meeting with doctors, sitting in clinics and touring different departments throughout the hospital. My eyes were opened to the expertise, resource needs and opportunities as well as the challenges in health care.

I also participated this spring in a Denver Public Schools Day of Service with Noble Energy and the Denver Broncos where we helped move classroom furniture at Cheltenham Elementary School, participated in field day activities and met with the principal and teachers. As a parent, education is a top priority for me, and being able to step into the hallways for the day and feel the impact of budget cuts was eye-opening. Read more after the jump…

Meeting With a Corporate Partner For a Sponsorship? Be Prepared.

6 Tips To Prepare For a Sponsorship Meeting With a Corporate Partner | GroundFloor Media PR Agency in DenverIf you are meeting with a corporate partner to discuss a sponsorship proposal or charitable donation request, be prepared. Just as you would prepare for a new business meeting or job interview, you have one shot to make the best possible impression, so do your homework and come to the meeting prepared. The key to success? It should be all about them.

Whether you have worked with a corporate partner for multiple years or you are meeting for the first time, here’s what to research, prepare and bring to the meeting:

Read more after the jump…

The Current State of CSR in America

Corporate Social Responsibility 2017 Report

Photo Credit: Cone Communications

“2017 will be remembered as the year that redefined corporate social responsibility. Although CSR will always be grounded in business operations…the stakes have gotten a lot higher. Companies must now share not only what they are doing, but what they believe in.”

 ~ 2017 Cone Communications CSR Study

Cone Communications recently released the results of its annual CSR study, and as usual, it was packed with great insights for cause marketers. While a full breakdown of the study results can be found on Cone Communications’ website, I want to focus on three points in particular.

Read more after the jump…

Small Idea, Big Movement

bohsw-zcuaavuieI love great ideas! Especially the ones that start out small but then revolutionize an industry. In 2007, a like-minded group of individuals, including Pam Warhurst and Mary Clear, wanted to find a way in which everyone could help improve their own community. Their solution: They taught their local residents to take control of their community through gardening and eating.

“The answer was food,” said Warhurst in her TED Talk. “Everyone understands food. Food gets people talking; even better, it inspires people to take action.” They started with small herb gardens and community plots in a Northern England town called Todmorden. Then they planted corn in front of a police station, fruit trees on the sides of roads, vegetables in front of the senior center, and even planted gardens in the cemetery, where “things grow really well because the soil is really good!” Read more after the jump…

New Research on Millennial Habits and Corporate Social Responsibility

Millennials – they seem to be all the marketing world is buzzing about these days.

And for good reason. According to Dan Schawbel’s January 2015 Forbes article, “10 New Findings About The Millennial Consumer,” there are 80 million Millennials with $200 billion in annual purchasing power in the U.S. alone. No wonder companies are clamoring to find ways to engage them.

Read more after the jump…

Cause Marketing – Insights and Trends

Cause marketing is here to stay. That is the conclusion reached by Cone Communications in its recently released 2013 Cone Communications Social Impact Study, which takes a comprehensive look at 20 years of cause marketing-related data. A few notable statistics right off the bat:

  • 54 percent of U.S. consumers bought a product associated with a cause over the last 12 months, increasing 170 percent since 1993.
  • 89 percent of Americans are likely to switch brands to one associated with a cause, given comparable price and quality, jumping nearly 35 percent since 1993.
  • 91 percent want even more of the products and services they use to support a cause.

Read more after the jump…

Cause Marketing “Coopetition” – Joining Forces to Make a Big Impact

I recently came across an article on Forbes.com titled “Cause Marketing Coopetition on the Rise” by cause marketing guru David Hessekiel that I wanted to share here – because, to me, it really speaks to the true spirit of cause marketing (or at least what that spirit should be).

Read more after the jump…