Tag Archives: design

PR Snafus from the Week that Was — and Social Media’s Response to Them

weekly-reads-header-5

There’s a social media axiom heavily utilized – some would say over utilized – by those seeking to juxtapose gaffes alongside even bigger gaffes. That term? “Hold my beer.” To say it was used a lot this week might be an understatement. In this week’s editions of Weekly Reads, we take a look at how social media responded to some of the biggest PR snafus from the week that was. 

USA Today: Airlines take to Twitter to exploit United’s misfortune

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz has put his foot in his mouth several times in the wake of a video-taped incident that saw a United passenger dragged off a flight. Munoz may also now regret the time he described his competitors in the Persian Gulf as “not real airlines.” At the very least, it seems Emirates and Royal Jordanian airlines haven’t forgotten about that old comment, as both took to Twitter this week to reexamine it alongside some of United’s recent blunders.

NPR: Unforeseen Achilles heel of clever Burger King marketing ploy

Burger King produced an ad in which its spokesperson tells the camera, “OK Google, what is the Whopper burger?” The ad was meant to activate Google Home devices, which would then in turn read off a description of the Whopper burger from Wikipedia. It proved to be a very clever and effective ploy — until someone changed the ingredients in the Whopper on Wikipedia to “chocolate candy, toenail clippings, cyanide, rat and a medium-sized child.”

Huffington Post: Public perception of Pepsi’s Kendall Jenner surprisingly mixed

Pepsi quickly pulled and apologized for an ad featuring Kendall Jenner after critics widely scorned the company for seeming to purport that the offering of a soft drink might quell tensions between police officers and Black Lives Matter protesters. But interestingly enough, an online poll found that 44 percent of those surveyed had a more favorable view of Pepsi after viewing the ad.

Washington Post: News about ‘white is purity’ campaign from Nivea gets buried

In the ad campaign you may have missed amidst the backlash about the three larger companies just mentioned, Nivea tossed up a post on its Middle Eastern Facebook page as part of a deodorant campaign that suggested “White is Purity.” Perhaps as ill-fated as the campaign itself, the company took to social media with the quasi-justification that the Facebook post was somehow less offensive because it was intended for a Middle Eastern audience.

CBS News: Anti-Defamation League seizes opportunity presented by Sean Spicer

Perhaps the most widely publicized gaffe of the week came from White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. In an attempt to criticize Bashar al-Assad’s chemical weapons attack in Syria, Spicer claimed “not even Hitler used chemical weapons” — a claim that flew in the face of the fact that Hitler used gas chambers during the Holocaust. The Anti-Defamation League used the misstep as an avenue to promote its Holocaust education classes, making a public offer to discount its classes if Spicer should want to enroll.

On the Blog:

Project Highlight:

tennyson-center-case-study-horse-e1475013544374

Tennyson Center for Children | Gratitude Annual Report Design

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, making it a great time to highlight the design work we’ve done on the annual reports for Tennyson Center for Children, a nonprofit that works wonders with victims of child abuse.

Will Every Social Media Platform Eventually Have “Stories?”

weekly-reads-header-5

The big news this week is Facebook adding “Stories” to its main app – copying Instagram, which copied Snapchat. This raises a lot of questions for those of us in the content creation world. As social platforms begin to look more and more like one another it raises two conflicting questions: What’s possibly next, and where does it end? We’re also featuring an article that discusses the fine line between over-sharing and avoiding social media altogether.

Facebook:

AdAge: Facebook Adds Disappearing ‘Stories’ to Main App, Copying Snapchat Yet Again
It was only a matter of time: Facebook Stories are here. The immediate knee jerk reaction is likely, “REALLY!?!? Now we have to create disappearing stories on THREE different platforms!!” But as marketers, we need to remember that our audiences expect different content on different platforms (after all, they are different audiences inherently on each platform), and we can help set expectations for the type, and amount of content we produce for each channel… even if three of them have similar features.

Instagram:

Glossy: How Instagram Beat Out Snapchat as Fashion’s ‘Social Media Darling’
Speaking of competition for “stories,” this article is a great breakdown of how one industry has self-selected Instagram over Snapchat, and how Instagram Stories played a major role in adoption (not to mention the platform’s more “polished” look and feel). A similar sentiment to the story listed above – different audiences are looking for different content on various platforms. At least for today… Instagram boasts an audience with more spending power than Snapchat.

Digital Advertising:

The Drum: Internet Ad Spend to Surpass TV for the First Time in 2017
For those of us born before 1997 (haha), it’s easy to remember the stories about digital advertising’s growth – from double-digits, eventually to “billions” – and now we’re approaching another milestone. As content offerings change user behavior, digital advertising spends are poised to surpass television spends this year.

Trends:

Ad Age: Video: The Darker Side of Data
More time spent on digital platforms means more advertising spend on said platforms. Which begs the question, “Will all of this data and automation lead to mistrust, or consumer backlash, in the future?” This article outlines how a recent murder case in Arkansas was seeking data from an Amazon Echo and explores the line between convenience and privacy. To be sure, “We need to approach these tools and platforms in a way that never breaches the trust, and that we do so in a way that is secure and sustainable.”

On the Blog:

Even Professional Designers Need a Creative Outlet – This week, our creative mind, Ben Hock, explores where a creative type can find some inspiration.

Project Highlight:

ncsl-seo-case-study-e1475013106965National Conference of State Legislatures | SEO
Our team used search engine optimization strategies to boost the wealth of unique content in organic search, leading to increased readership.

Even Professional Designers Need a Creative Outlet

As the director of creative development at CenterTable, my goal is to make sure our clients have all the tools they need to visually tell their stories. I love the variety of projects I get to work on and all the amazing businesses and nonprofits I’m able to collaborate with. Telling meaningful stories is what inspires me to become a better designer and a more creative problem-solver. However, for a long time I’ve missed telling my own stories through art and design. Read more after the jump…

What do you need to manage a Facebook Live broadcast?

weekly-reads-header-5

We all know that live video can result in huge impression numbers on multiple social media platforms, but what do you need to know to get the most out of a live video opportunity? This week’s reads touch on a variety of topics – from live video to block and tackle ways to capture email. Read more after the jump…

Holiday Movie Color Palettes

The red and green color combination is synonymous with Christmas. Any time those colors are used together, the viewer will inevitably think of the holiday season. Color combinations also act as identifiers for movements, campaigns, brands and countries. The rainbow flag is a symbol of the LGBTQ community. Pink has become the color of breast cancer research and awareness. Tiffany & Co. is known for its specific shade of turquoise.

All visual designers have to be aware of how color adds nuance to our work. For example, an illustration in a cool palette could evoke completely different feelings than the same illustration in a warm palette. Color has a profound ability to act as a storytelling mechanism in art, and especially in film. In particular, filmmakers like Wes Anderson and Tim Burton are known for their distinctive use of color.

In the spirit of the holidays, I’ve taken scenes from six of my favorite holiday movies and simplified them into color palettes. Can you guess what the movies are just by looking at the colors? Some are easier to pick out than others. The answers are below.

christmas movie color script How the Grinch Stole Christmas Read more after the jump…

The Storytelling Power of Animated GIFs

Animated GIFs became more accessible than ever when Apple created its GIF keyboard for iOS 10. The addition offers users a fun, easy way to interact with friends on mobile that has further broadened our digital forms of expression. GIFs provide us with a visual way to describe how we’re feeling. My wife knows exactly what I’m trying to say when I send her a simple GIF of Michael Jordan crying, or Kim Kardashian rolling her eyes. Though sending these types of GIFs is an entertaining form of expression, they don’t even begin to show how powerful animated GIFs can be as a storytelling device. Businesses have an opportunity to use custom-designed GIFs to help tell their story and expand their reach. There are many super-talented artists creating amazing GIFs that transcend how most people view the medium, and companies should take notice. I’ve listed some of my favorite artists below:

Read more after the jump…