Tag Archives: issues management

PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade

USC Issues Management Win | PR Homerun: Turning Lemons into Lemonade | GroundFloor Media PR AgencyNegative media and social media coverage abounds, but in increasingly rare instances clients can turn potentially bad news into a positive or at least a learning opportunity.

Sometimes all it takes is a bit of creativity and humor to mitigate an issues management headache. Case in point, recently the University of Southern California unveiled a $700 million project in the heart of Los Angeles. Students from rival University of California at Los Angeles were quick to point out that a statue serving as the centerpiece of the development misspelled the name of “William Shakespeare” by leaving out the last “e” in the bard’s name.

The Tweet that followed: “USC. The only place in America that can unveil a statue as the centerpiece of a $700 million project and manage to misspell Shakespeare.”

Not taking the bait and issuing a stodgy response, USC issued the following statement:

“To E, or not to E, that is the question. Over the centuries his surname has been spelled 20 different ways. USC chose an older spelling because of the ancient feel of the statue, even though it is not the most common form.”

And with that response, the Twittersphere has been weighing in on the debates, with scholars pointing out USC might have a point. Even in his last will and testament, Shakespeare spelled his name two ways (both with an “e” and without an “e”). Also, printed programs from 1664, spelled the name without an “e.”

The Washington Post even had fun with the issue, saying visitors to the University of Southern California might be muttering, “What fools these mortals be,” as they stroll past a statue of the legendary queen of Troy and notice William Shakespeare’s name seemingly misspelled at the base. “To USC officials, it’s much ado about nothing.”

(GroundFloor Media’s Gil Rudawsky is a proud graduate of the University of Southern California.)

 

Respond to a Social Media Crisis #LikeABoss

twitterThis year created a library full of social media crisis communication case studies, both what to do and what not to do.

Heading into 2017, we advise all of our clients to refresh their social media crisis communication plans given the rapid growth and updates with social communication channels. To help get started, here are a few basic points that should be part of a plan:

Read more after the jump…

Reprise: What You Say Can and Will Be Used Against You

bhribahcqaax1h9Given the non-stop media chatter about leaked or hacked emails and recorded conversations, here is an updated blog post from several years ago with tips on how to keep yourself or your company out of the media cycle.

The scrappy Aspen Daily News has one of the best mottos in the business: “If You Don’t Want It Printed, Don’t Let It Happen.”

In the world of communications, we have a similar motto that we share with clients who are facing a pending crisis or are in the midst of one: “Anything You Say, Write, Email, Skype or iChat Can Be Used Against You.” It’s not as jocular as the News’ motto. But it just happens to be the truth in our increasingly litigious and curious world.

Clients can face all types of situations that are sensitive, controversial and deal with legal issues. While the lawyer’s role is to protect clients from and defend them during litigation, crisis communicators are focused on managing, protecting and — if needed — rebuilding the client’s reputation. They work closely with companies on strategy, messaging, stakeholder communications and media relations before, during and after a crisis.

Read more after the jump…

The Impacts of Emotional Intelligence

team_work_business_template_design_graphics_549234Emotional intelligence, known as EQ, is being touted as a key ingredient to surviving any working environment. Don’t get me wrong, IQ is still important and not to be dismissed. But the EQ is playing a critical role within the PR profession as digital media, client demands and no-such- thing-as-being-offline expectations seem to be the new norm. Read more after the jump…

PR Lessons from “Game of Thrones”

GOT logo for blog

Image Credit: HBO

While not all GFMers watch “Game of Thrones,” there are a number of us who are huge fans. We like to share articles about predictions for upcoming episodes and then rehash all of the action from the previous night’s episode on Monday morning. So when Ragan’s PR Daily put out an article today entitled “8 PR lessons from ‘Game of Thrones,’” I couldn’t help myself – I had to click on it. Their 8 tips were based on quotes by various characters from the show. See below for my take on each:

Read more after the jump…

Tips On Identifying A Social Media Crisis

reputation managementSocial media is a great breeding ground for a crisis, whether justified or not.

But before your company or client pulls out all the stops to try to save its reputation, here are some common sense criteria to help navigate through the storm:

Where is the negative issue brewing?

Negative comments on your company’s social media pages should most likely be addressed as these comments are now on your “home turf.” Issues that fall into this category include negative comments or reviews by members or the general public. Since this commentary is considered to be on your home turf, it is worth a response. This does not mean comments found outside own social media properties will not be addressed; but it is a good first question to ask.

How “loud” is the comment?

The Internet is a BIG place, and without some filters a lot of time could be spent addressing everyone who shares negative issues on social media. Ask how much “noise” is being made about this particular topic? Pay attention to commenters with a small audience, but don’t fan the flames. More visible outlets might need a more proactive strategy.

Is the information blatantly inaccurate?

While many postings are about an individual’s specific situation and thus somewhat subjective, occasionally true misinformation will be posted online. In these cases, it is important to correct the facts.

What is the tone or topic?

If the tone of an internal conversation or post on a message board is not overtly negative, a response may not be needed. That said, if the comment raises slight concern, it should be addressed appropriately.

And remember to have a thick skin.

SeaWorld On The Offensive With New Orca Campaign

SeaWorld Entertainment is in full response mode as the two-year-old documentary “Blackfish” continues to gain momentum.

The documentary alleges cruel treatment of the orca, or killer whales, that SeaWorld has in captivity and uses as part of its public entertainment program. The result has had a distinct impact on the publicly traded company’s bottom line, with its stock and attendance numbers in a continued free fall.

Read more after the jump…

How Much Damage Did That Tweet Cause?

It was bad, but did it hurt the company's reputation?

It was bad, but did it hurt the company’s reputation?

As we head into two weeks of Super Bowl coverage, we’ll see more and more about “what brands will be tweeting” from the publications that cover the marketing and communications industry. The articles brought up a concept that I first came across at a South by Southwest session back in 2011: Do even the worst social media flub ups cause real repetitional  damage for a brand?

Read more after the jump…

Crisis Communication Plan: How To Plan For a Crisis

Photo courtesy Orange County Archives via Flickr

Photo courtesy Orange County Archives via Flickr

As communicators with nearly 20 years of experience each, the team at GFM has seen almost every kind of communications crisis out there. From crises you can plan for – such as announcing a bankruptcy filing – to those you can’t see coming – like a natural disaster forcing a temporary business closure – there’s one common thread: having a tested crisis communications plan in place makes all the difference.

Whether you’re drafting your very first crisis plan or refreshing an old version, here are some tips for making sure your plan is comprehensive:

Read more after the jump…

GroundFloor Media’s Gil Rudawsky Denver Business Journal Article on Email Tips

dilbert-email

Everything you say can and will be used against you. This is especially true these days as more people send texts, emails and tweets rather than picking up the phone or, gasp, meet in person.

But there’s a downside. When conversations go sour, you have created a track record that can be shared with the world. In his latest Denver Business Journal column Gil Rudawsky offers a prominent case study on what not to do, the reaction and he provides some tips to avoid causing you, your company or client a crisis.

Read the entire article here.