Tag Archives: rudawsky

Reports: Denver Post Hedge Fund Owner Squeezing Profits

The Denver Newspaper Guild held a rally outside The Denver Post condemning downsizing actions by owner Alden Global Capital. Provided by Denver Newspaper Guild

The Denver Newspaper Guild held a rally outside The Denver Post condemning downsizing actions by owner Alden Global Capital. Provided by Denver Newspaper Guild

Media covering itself is always a challenge particularly among competitors. But alternative weekly Westword did a good job of detailing the changes and challenges facing The Denver Post in a long-form article this week. Also, this week 5280 magazine did a piece on the Post’s new normal.

The focus of the articles is on its hedge fund owner, and its track record of squeezing profits at the expense of a diminishing product. The Westwood piece chronicles the failed attempts by the newspaper and its owner, Media News Group, to reinvent itself in the changing media market. In case you don’t want to read the entire article on the Post, here are some highlights:

Read more after the jump…

PR Complaints About Journalists

Changing JournalismMedia complaints about public relations pros are well known: too many lame pitches, misleading pitches, ill-timed pitches and incessant follow-ups.   But it’s a two-way street.  PR folks can be just as frustrated with with the media. Digiday offers some pet peeves that agencies have with the media. I can attest that all of them are based in some reality. Here are some of the highlights submitted by PR firms to Digiday, along with some personal experiences: Read more after the jump…

Reporter Talks About Being Human In Goodbye Column

Jack Broom Seattle Times

Using the two-way radio in a photographer’s car, Jack Broom calls the newsroom with the details of a breaking story in 1978. (Greg Gilbert/The Seattle Times)

Over the years, I’ve read many farewell columns by retiring or transitioning journalists.

Even before the profession hit this sustained downturn, I mostly thought these columns were self-serving, focusing on the glory days of news reporting, and self-aggrandizing about news stories uncovered.

With so many departing journalists, the farewell column has become cliché, and editors are surely loathed to provide the opportunity to all those leaving. And readers, remember them, aren’t interested.

This week, however, I came across a particularly poignant goodbye column by a reporter retiring from The Seattle Times after nearly 40 years.

Jack Broom was a general assignment reporter, which means he usually covered the big stories of the day, and when there wasn’t breaking news, he would work on occasional feature stories. General assignment reporters are a special breed; they can cover a legislative hearing one day and a volcanic eruption the next with the same grace and poise.

Broom started reporting when newsrooms were filled with typewriters, and over the years had the dubious honor of writing obituaries for his colleagues. There are few journalists left like him.

Broom saw his role as a journalist quite simply. “My goals have been straightforward: To tell readers something about the community and world they live in, and — if possible — help them enjoy the time they spent with the newspaper.”

Read more after the jump…

Master the Television Interview With These Tips

IMG_5386All media interviews are not created equal.
Case in point: speaking to a television reporter is different than a newspaper reporter. The former wants quick sound bites and the latter may want more background and an extended interview. During a recent television media training session for one of our clients, the GroundFloor Media team offered the following tips for mastering the television interview:

Look the part: A suit and tie at the dog park is not realistic
Prepare sound bites: Don’t over answer, and remember they will only likely use 20 seconds of what you say
Show some emotion: You are passionate about what you do, show it
Share questions with interviewer: Gently helping them know what to ask can steer the interview in the right direction
Body language matters: Don’t fidget
Speak slowly: Remember to pause, and that you speak faster when you are nervous
Nothing is off the record: If you are miked up, you are on the record
Don’t answer every question: Keep to your messages and sound bites
Be comfortable with silence: Wait for the next question instead of filling the empty space
Practice: This is key. Most of us are not comfortable under the lights

In most cases, television reporters want you to do well on camera, and the more you are prepared the better you will come off on camera. And for most people, speaking in front of a camera is uncomfortable, so practice, practice, practice.

Gil Rudawsky Featured in Denver Business Journal

GroundFloor Media’s Vice President Gil Rudawsky had a recent column on a former journalist  working in the world of public relations published in the Denver Business Journal. Rudawsky highlights six misconceptions that some journalists have about PR professionals:

1) PR pros don’t work hard
2) There are no deadlines in PR
3) No stress
4) PR people don’t know how to write
5) PR pros couldn’t make it as journalists
6) PR is just spin

Find out the truth about these misconceptions over at the DBJ.

Red Cross Faces Reputational Disaster

Screen Shot 2014-11-03 at 10.16.17 AMAn investigative report from NPR and ProPublica has sent the aid organization scrambling to downplay its findings. Instead, the Red Cross should own up to mistakes and promise to correct them. Read more about tips from GroundFloor Media’s Gil Rudawsky how the organization can take to fix its reputation in this PR Daily article.

Dangers of Going ‘Off the Record’ With Reporters

Screen Shot 2014-10-13 at 9.20.32 AMDuring a recent media training with clients, there was a discussion if you can still share information “off-the-record” or “on background” with reporters.

It’s a tough call, and particularly these days when reporters are under even more pressure to get a scoop. The concepts of “on background” and “off the record” are confusing even to some seasoned reporters.

In the era of quick-hit reporting and little or no source-building, there are times when it makes sense to provide the media more than simply a short official statement.

In most crisis communication scenarios, a statement is the go-to, tried and true media response. Longer interviews or long responses get shortened or paraphrased—and often misrepresented. There are ways to get an issue across outside of an official statement, but they, too, have pitfalls.

Among those ways is to speak to a reporter off the record.
Read more after the jump…

Remembering The Jayson Blair Scandal

jayson_blair_cnn_larry_kingThis month, PBS premiered a documentary called “The Fragile Trust” on the shocking story of former New York Times reporter Jayson Blair.

The Blair story is about an up-and-coming reporter who fabricated and plagiarized many of his articles, including some that ended up on the Times’ front page. The documentary producers talk to Blair about what happened leading up to and after he was discovered in 2003. Blair now blames mental illness and stress for his transgressions.

Read more after the jump…

Business Development And Being the Stoner State

Screen Shot 2014-05-07 at 4.48.13 PMColorado is all over the national media these days, but it might not be the kind of press that the state is looking for in terms of economic development. Marijuana has quickly become Colorado’s signature issue in the media, and the coverage hasn’t exactly portrayed the state in a favorable light.

During the recent Colorado Experience, hosted by the Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation, Kelly Brough said while the state is getting lots of press, it really hasn’t changed the way Colorado does business.

“Despite what everyone is saying, the marijuana industry is small,” Brough, the executive director of the Metro Denver Chamber, told about 120 business executives on a tour of Pueblo. “Revenues are so small it doesn’t even rank with our other industries.”
Read more after the jump…

As Boulder Floods Rage, Open Communication Offers A Lifeline

photo[2]As my community was deluged with five straight days of incessant rain, I became the consumer of crisis communications rather than the provider.

With the tables turned, I relied on my government, businesses, and neighborhood groups to provide key information, such as: Is my water safe to drink? When will my power be back on? Can I flush the toilet? And who has a wet-dry vac I can borrow?

The rain fell in Boulder for a week straight. There were degrees of rainfall, from torrential to just simply rain, but not once did it cease.

Read more after the jump…