Tag Archives: tv

Aspect Ratios and Storytelling

A wide shot of the vastness of space. An intimate home video of a child’s first steps. A social media savvy YouTube vlogger with the latest and greatest in makeup techniques. Whatever you may be watching, there should be an essence to the visuals that feels cohesive with the content being portrayed. Certain shots feel right at home in a reality TV drama, while others perfectly capture the epic grandeur of a Hollywood blockbuster. The culprit is often staring at you right through a letterbox (rimshot): aspect ratio. Read more after the jump…

The NFL’s Social Media Policy Won’t Fix Their Ratings Problem

The NFL recently decided to ban teams from posting gifs and videos from games on their social media accounts. Under the new policy, a team can’t post footage before or during games and may only retweet or share media that has already been posted on social by the NFL. This new move has prompted some teams to poke fun at the league by using creative workarounds to distribute game news to their fans and followers. It’s also made some people wonder if the NFL instituted the move to help increase viewership after a downward trend. The NFL seems to think that by restricting access to video on social, TV viewership will increase and all their problems will be solved. What the NFL doesn’t grasp is that restricting access to video on social media is counterintuitive to growing the NFL as a global game.

Enter the NBA. Read more after the jump…

State of News Media Shows Changing Habits of Americans

Fellow iPad UserI recently caught a segment on CBS Sunday Morning about a Spanish language TV show called “Sábado Gigante,” a three-hour program that airs every Saturday night and is viewed by millions of people in the U.S. and in 40 countries around the world. The interview included Don Francisco, the gregarious host who has missed just one week in the 53 years since the show began. Amid declining viewership over the past few years, particularly among younger viewers, the show is ending its historic run.

That’s just one example of how TV viewing habits have changed dramatically over the past decade, particularly among the Gen X and Y viewers. Many in these age groups are forgoing cable TV in favor of the massive on-demand content of Hulu, Netflix and Amazon Instant Video. According to a Retrevo “Pulse Report,” 23 percent of people under 25 watch most of their television content online compared with just 8 percent of people over 25.

Read more after the jump…

Public’s distrust for media grows: Why?

The trend of polarizing media outlets commenting on issues instead of covering them might be fueling the public’s lack of trust in journalism, which is reaching levels never seen before.

A Gallup survey conducted this month found a jaw-dropping 60 percent of the American public surveyed “have little or no trust in the mass media to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly.”

This lack of trust in traditional mass media, such as newspapers, radio, and TV, is up from the past few years, and up a full 5 percentage points from last year.

“The current gap between negative and positive views—20 percentage points—is by far the highest Gallup has recorded since it began regularly asking the question in the 1990s,” wrote Gallup’s Lymari Morales.

Read more about what a veteran journalist says at Ragan’s PRDaily.