GroundFloor Media & CenterTable Blog

IMG_5386All media interviews are not created equal.
Case in point: speaking to a television reporter is different than a newspaper reporter. The former wants quick sound bites and the latter may want more background and an extended interview. During a recent television media training session for one of our clients, the GroundFloor Media team offered the following tips for mastering the television interview:

Look the part: A suit and tie at the dog park is not realistic
Prepare sound bites: Don’t over answer, and remember they will only likely use 20 seconds of what you say
Show some emotion: You are passionate about what you do, show it
Share questions with interviewer: Gently helping them know what to ask can steer the interview in the right direction
Body language matters: Don’t fidget
Speak slowly: Remember to pause, and that you speak faster when you are nervous
Nothing is off the record: If you are miked up, you are on the record
Don’t answer every question: Keep to your messages and sound bites
Be comfortable with silence: Wait for the next question instead of filling the empty space
Practice: This is key. Most of us are not comfortable under the lights

In most cases, television reporters want you to do well on camera, and the more you are prepared the better you will come off on camera. And for most people, speaking in front of a camera is uncomfortable, so practice, practice, practice.

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